Repotting Monstera is not difficult, monstera needs repotting every year or after two years, Recently I have also repotted my favorite monstera mini. In this article at Growncares, we are going to discuss, how you can do the repotting of monstera in the right way.

When You Need To Repot Monstera

Every plant shows some signs when they need to be repotted and a few of them are mentioned here, and all these will be helpful to know the conditions of every houseplant.

Extra Grown Roots

At different times, we have spotted some roots viable in the pot at the top, these roots show that your pot is fully filled with roots and no room for these roots and it also affects the growth of plants. And if you will check all the sides of the pot by removing soil through your hand, you will notice a lot of roots that are tightened enough and find more room. Monstera roots grow too fast and it’s a result of the healthy plant so it needs repotting every year.

Watering Issue

Water problems are really serious and they will seriously affect the growth and health of your monstera plant. You need to report to your plant as soon as possible if the water is drying too fast or if the water stays longer in the pot as the water issues in the pot.

If water is dying too fast it means you need to report the plant in a bigger pot which can bring moisture for a long time. If water is staying for a long time or not drying quickly, it can be because of many factors.

  • Watering plant very frequently with too much water
  • Pot is too long
  • pot is not having a drainage hole at its bottom
  • Your potting mixture is no longer suitable
See also  Mini Monstera Ginny (Philodendron Ginny) Care Guide

In these cases repotting is necessary, and in the end, it will recommend you to water the plant when it needs or it will also cause water issues.

See also  Cissus Discolor AKA Begonia Vine - A Stunning Tropical Plant

If you are a gardening lover you must be in love with pothos, so here is the guide about repotting pothos.

Too Much Brown Or yellow Leaves

No need to worry about the plant if it just has two or three yellow leaves, because it’s natural, and some old leaves change their color when they are not active. You can’t stop this process and it is not bad for your monstera. But too many yellow or brown leaves are not good and its shows that plant is having any problem. At first over and underwatering are two common problems behind this and some main reasons are listed here.

  • Over or underwatering
  • Bad soil
  • unfertile soil or too much fertile

You will personally know all these things and will understand why this problem comes. Is it because of a watering issue or due to soil? I hope you will understand the problem.

Repotting Monstera

Pot Selection

Repotting should be done in a bigger pot, so roots will stay easy in them. You can use a bigger pot than an older one or try to increase the length and width by about 2 inches more than the older pot. Make sure that the pot is having a drainage hole at its bottom and if you are interested in repotting the plant in a bigger pot then be ready to face watering issues. It’s better to go for the next size pot because you have to repot it again after a year and it’s better instead of putting your plant at risk.

Potting Mixture

You don’t need to have any special soil for monstera but local houseplant soil is suitable for monstera and you can add a perlite mixture for better moisture conditions.

See also  Philodendron Gloriosum Best Care And Propagation Guide

Some Required Tools

  • A Garden towel will help loosen the roots of the plant
  • Gloves to keep your hand clean
  • In case of watering issues repotting, you must have a cutter or knife to remove leggy growths

Remove Monstera From Older Pot

Monstera is having too many roots and you can use a garden towel to help them at this stage. Simply place your pot on a side and your plant will come out slightly with a little punch on the side of the pot. Never select a pot whose top is narrow and the bottom is wide because it will be difficult to plant safely with bundles of roots like monstera.

See also  Silver Satin Pothos: Best Care Guide With Details

Loosen The Root Ball

After taking the roots ball out from the older pot look at it carefully. Most of the healthy roots will be white or brown in color and feels soggy to touch. Loosen the roots if roots are tightly packed, don’t separate the roots, just give them a little room and it will be helpful.

Plant In New Pot

At first, put a stone or paper to cover the drainage hole and it will not allow the soil to come out of this. Now add a little part of your potting mixture and place your plant in it, don’t fill the pot with soil but cover all the roots and save place to water the plant easily. And that’s it you have done with this repotting process.

how to repot a monstera

Read More: String of Turtles (Peperomia Prostrata) Care And Propagation Guide

Some Tips To Apply After Repotting

Keep At The Same Spot

Keep the plant in the same place where it was before repotting, so it will prevent the plant shock. If you want to change the location or repotted a newly bought monstera plant, then try to provide the best light, moisture, water, and humidity conditions for best results.

Water The Plant

Water your plant about 1 day after repotting or you can water about soil conditions and understand the soil conditions for water, so you will prevent overwatering.

Fertilize The Plant

When you will repot your plant it will surely get fertilizers from new soil. New soil has some nutrients and abilities which don’t need to be fertilized and you should continue the fertilizing process after one month of 15 days.

No need to be worried if you break one or two roots during repotting process and enjoy gardening with Growncares.